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Girls at the Salesian Sisters' project, City of Joy, in Zambia

In her latest article on the work of Share the Light, Sophie Astles writes about some of the ways advocates and their families have recently been able to offer direct support to young people in Zambia.

 

Period poverty refers to a lack of access to sanitary products due to financial constraints. It is a global issue and has recently made the headlines in the UK, with the government pledging to fund free sanitary products in all English secondary schools, following a similar scheme that has already launched in Scotland.

 

A lack of access to sanitary protection brings a range of hygiene risks, but can also have a significant impact on attendance at school. For example, it is estimated that 1 in 10 girls in Africa miss at least one day of school a month as they are unable to afford sanitary products, or because their schools lack clean, safe toilets. It’s easy to forget the importance of menstrual care, particularly when you’ve never had to worry about it, but for many women both in the UK and across the world, getting hold of a tampon is not just a question of popping to the chemist.

 

At Share the Light, we’re incredibly lucky to have some talented, engaged and enthusiastic supporters. Sharon read an article discussing the lengths some women go to in order to access sanitary protection and wanted to do something to help. Her thoughts went to Share the Light and she set herself a target of raising £500 to cover the costs of sanitary products for the girls living at the City of Joy.

Published in Featured News

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Sophie Astles continues our series of articles from Share the Light, a charity created from the projects and links developed by the staff and students of Salesian College Farnborough with young people in Zambia.

 

Home: the place where one lives permanently, especially as a member of a family or household. A safe and loving family home is certainly something I have always taken for granted, particularly as a child. Many of us are lucky enough for this to be a given and to grow up without even having to consider an alternative. However, for many children around the world, a secure home and family is not always the reality.

 

Zambia has been badly affected by the AIDS crisis, and this has left many families with the eldest sibling at the head. Alongside high levels of poverty, this leaves girls and young women particularly vulnerable, open to abuse and unsafe in their own homes. In response to this, the Salesian Sisters founded the City of Joy in 2008.

Published in Featured News

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In this month's article from Share the Light, a charity created from the projects and links developed by the staff and students of Salesian College Farnborough with young people in Zambia, Sophie Astles celebrates the achievements of a busy 2018.

 

The New Year is a time to look forward, but also a time for reflection and taking stock on the past twelve months. It’s been a busy year at Share the Light, with plenty of successes to celebrate. Here’s a round-up of some of our highlights of 2018:

 

January:
We celebrated Fostina, (photo above) one of our scholarship students, as she finished the first six months of her nursing course. Fostina reached out to Share the Light in April 2017 after meeting many of the advocates when they visited the City of Joy. She had graduated with good grades, but had no funds to continue her studies. With our help, she started a nursing course in Lusaka in July 2017.

Published in Featured News

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Sophie Astles continues our series of articles from Share the Light, a charity created from the projects and links developed by the staff and students of Salesian College Farnborough with young people in Zambia.

 

One of our key objectives at Share the Light is to develop young people who are articulate, informed and personally engaged 'advocates' for the developing world. This dates back to the first trip from Salesian College Farnborough to Mazabuka in 2012, and since then, the advocate programme has been a central part of the work carried out by Share the Light. It ensures that close links are maintained between the charity, the community and the projects we support, and helps engender a sense of investment in the success of our work. Our aim is to work with those we support and tailor our projects by listening and responding to the community, in order to provide assistance where it is most needed. Our advocates programme helps us to strengthen the ties that make this possible.

Published in Featured News

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